Joint National Disaster Management- Reports from Vanuatu 18th March 2015

The details from on the ground assessments.

25 March 2015

Joint National Disaster Management Office – Vanuatu Country Team  

Needs Assessment Mission to Tafea Island Province and includes the Islands of Tanna, Aneityum, Futuna and Erromango

17-18 March 2015

Introduction:

The National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) together with representatives from the Vanuatu Country Team (VCT) conducted an assessment of Tafea Province on 17 -18 March 2015. The aim of the initial rapid assessment is to obtain a baseline overview of the situation on the ground in order to reach a common understanding of the scale and severity of the response to Cyclone Pam and target the response accordingly.

Two teams were dispatched with Team 1 to Erromango and Team 2 to Tanna. It is also noted that Team 2 visited the Islands of Aneityum and Furma. A secondary component of the Team 2 mission included the medical evacuation of a 9yr old girl that had sustained a critical head injury during the storm.

Team 1 Report

[To be completed]

Team 2 Report

Futuna

Only one member of the team (IFRC – FACT member) attended the Island and met with the Village Chief. This was the first outside person on the island and reported the following.

  1. No deaths
  2. Some minor injuries
  3. Communications tower is down and in urgent need of repairs
  4. All residents have access to clean drinking water
  5. Local vegetable gardens are damaged and remaining crops will last 2 weeks.
  6. Fruit and banana trees are damaged but no percentage was given
  7. Local shops are open and trading.

Tanna

Upon arrival the team was transport from the airport to the Provincial Disaster Committee in Isangel. The team took part in the islands inter-agency emergency management meeting and was given unrestricted access to all existing information including the most recent situation report. During the assessment the teams provided a short briefing of the terms of the objective, assessment gathering methodology and reporting.

The Island had sustained major damage to dwellings and all critical infrastructures. There is an urgent need to address many of the recommendations identified in this report.

Key Findings/Observations:

Access

  1. The Airport and Seaport are both open, island roads to affected communities are partially accessible.
  2. The main road from the airport to Isangel is open with some minor damage. All bridges on this road are in very good order.
  3. The roads to the north are slowly being cleared and should but fully opened in a week.
  4. The roads to the east of Isangel are open and the roads to the south of Isangel are still blocked by debris and will require teams for another week until full access is obtained.

WASH

  1. Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) is a key concern for the Island. Much of the island relies on rain water gathered by tanks for general consumption. Many of these tanks were destroyed with their houses and this has significantly affected the supply of drinking water.
    1. Pit toilets are currently being dug to cover the sanitation needs of the community which was the norm prior to the Cyclone. Some of the homes had flushing toilets but these are no longer functioning.
    2. The team observed people carrying water in buckets from an unknown water source near Isangel, the supply needs to be assessed. In the eastern area of Whitesands, water is being collect from up to 4 Km from the homes.
    3. There are bore sites available but most have been damaged or contaminated by sea water and are unusable. Current water supplies are either exhausted in certain areas or very low in others.

Electricity

  1. According to provincial authorities and observation, the electricity supply does not operate and much of the infrastructure is destroyed.
  2. Authorities have determined that it will take months to be fully restored.
  3. There are a limited number of generators on the island and these have in some cases been affected by the storm.

Housing and Evacuation Centres

  1. Secretary General reported that more than 1000 people are displaced with their homes destroyed whilst many other homes are badly damaged.
  2. People are living in schools that are being used as evacuation shelters. Many of the schools are also damaged.

Health

  1. The local hospital has been substantially damaged, they have some ability to treat critical emergency patients but the vast majority of other patients have been sent home in the care of relatives or friends. This includes many woman that are in their third trimester and will be forced to deliver at home.
  2. The hospital has a critical shortage of medicine and surgical supply. They have limited cold chain storage due many to a lack of fuel for their generator which is only operated in the morning and late afternoon and only for a couple of hours at a time.
  3. There will be a need to address psycho-social issues soon as many of the community including children are visually distressed.

Food

  1. Food stocks are depleted given that the majority of stored food was either damaged or destroyed in the Cyclone.
  2. There is a need for rice and tinned meat to cover the damaged stock.
  3. Secretary General has stated that they have a storage and distribution plan that will be activated once aid arrives.
  4. Due to the lack of electricity there is no cold chain storage.
  5. The banana plantation is approx. 90% damaged; there is only two weeks of produce left.
  6. It is currently Yam season and communities are actively harvesting however concerns of more rain may influence how much of the crop will be spoiled in the ground.
  7. There is no stock of fresh fruit and vegetables on the Island.
  8. Most livestock were killed in the cyclone, this will inhibit access to meat in general.
  9. Many fishing boats were damaged or destroyed and the ones remaining are yet to recommence fishing activities due to the seas.
  10. At the time of this report the agriculture representative had not returned form mission however future reports will identify their findings.

Waste Management

  1. Waste management is not currently an issue however with the need to dispose of general debris from the cyclone local refuse areas will fill quickly.

Security

  1. Minor issue of security on the Island with scavenging for building materials causing minor altercations between locals.
  2. Local woman’s refuge group sits on the PDC and reported that there is no increase in assaults to woman or children. Overall security on the Island was stable but will be influenced with further delays in sending aid.

Recommendations

WASH

  1. Supplies of bottled water in the short term
  2. Set up an emergency/relief potable water supply distribution system
  3. 10L collapsible water bladders
  4. Water purification tablets
  5. Hygiene kits

Food

  1. Supply of tinned meat and rice

Shelter

  1. Tents/tarps for housing / schools
  2. Shelter tool kits

Health

  1. Medical supplies to support the hospital infrastructure.
  2. Regular medical visits and surveillance to the evacuation centers and the temporary shelters.
  3. Restore functionality of damaged health facilities and augment resources in affected communities to enable health services to reach isolated villages and to increase capability to respond to possible disease outbreaks.
  4. Mobile health teams to provide services to isolated areas. Potential need for Midwife services to reach woman delivering at home.
  5. Intensify health promotion and advocacy on disease prevention.     


 Misc Items.

  • Chainsaws to assist in road clearance.

Tafea Team

Team Leader 2: Warwick Kidd – Tanna,

Name

Area Covered

Warwick Kidd

UNDAC – General Assessment

Angus Hohenboken

Oxfam – Wash

Rebecca Olul

UNICEF – Protection

Christinea Karae

UNICEF – Education

Basil Leudun

MoH – Health

Hanna Butler

IFRC – FACT

Douglas Clark

IFRC – FACT

 

Agriculture

 

Shelter

 

Joint National Disaster Management Office – Vanuatu Country Team

Needs Assessment Mission to Pentecost Island

18 March 2015

Introduction:

The assessment team consisting of DARD, ADRA Vanuatu, and MOE conducted in Lonorore captured reports for central Pentecost and east Pentecost where some damage have been made by cyclone PAM. The aim of the initial rapid assessment is to obtain a more detailed overview of the situation on the ground in order to reach a common understanding of the scale and severity of the response to Cyclone Pam and target the response accordingly.

Due to geographical location, damaged infrastructure and time and financial constraint, the team was not able to make it to the central and eastern side which was reported to be more affected than the other areas of Pentecost. The respondents of the assessments are not from the damaged area, however, they are representative of World Vision and two agriculture field assistant officers and Department of Public Works Officer who have received reports and

Key Findings/Observations:

Infrastructure & Logistics

  1. Roads have been damaged and blocked by fallen trees from south to the Eastern side. Public works have cleared the roads from Melsisi to Lonorore only. The rest of the road to the Eastern side is partially damaged and not accessible for vehicles. Local NGOs are equipped with vehicles that can make it on the repaired roads only. Boat Transport are accessible to Lonorore Airport.

WASH

  1. Water Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) is a concern to Central Pentecost (Lonorore).Though they had flushed toilets, observations showed that no tools such as soap and other sanitation tools were used and flash toilets were not of hygiene standards.
  2. Due to lack of communication, no reports have been received on the status of eastern Pentecost.
  3. Reports indicate that there are 2 full water tanks central Pentecost but are now contaminated after the cyclone.
  4. Lonorore have water supply system but still reported to be still contaminated.

Evacuation Centre

  1. It was observed that the majority of the people are living in very good condition in the assessed areas.
  2. Rongon people have been reported to have used their Nakamal as their evacuation centre. 

Health

  1. Report from health worker of Lonorore Aid Post showed that there has not been a reported injury or sickness in the Aid Post including Melsisi Hospital due to the cyclone.
  2. No outbreaks of communicable diseases are reported to date. 
  3. There is also no infrastructural damage to the Aid Post buildings in the central area.

Food Security

  1. The majority of the farmlands observed in the central parts have not been damaged, however, hearsay reports say the eastern side have had a lot of damaged farmland and vegetation with significant impacts to the livelihoods and agriculture.
  2. Food is not an immediate concern, however sustaining food security, particularly on rice availability maybe an issue in the longer term due to the vast damage to agricultural crops and farmlands.

Communication

6.1 Communication has also been disrupted and yet to be restored.

Education

7.1 Schools that have been damaged at the moment are:

  • Santari school, south east
  • Melsisi school, central
  • Ranwadi High school, central
  • Upiku school, central

The team was not able to receive school reports from the eastern side.

Recommendations

  1. Schools that have been affected must be rebuilt so that children are able to convene normal classes.
  2. A detailed assessment to be carried out on the eastern side of Pentecost to gain a true report of the damage.

Pentecost (Penama) Team

Team Leader:  Mathias Bule

Cluster

Agency

Name

Food Security and Agriculture

DARD

Mathias Bule

 

 

Protection

ADRA Vanuatu

Tina Ilo NOKA

Education

MOE

Virana Lini

 

Joint National Disaster Management Office – Vanuatu Country Team  

Needs Assessment Mission to Emae Island, Shefa Province

18 March 2015

Introduction:

The National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) together with representatives from the Vanuatu Country Team (VCT) conducted an assessment of Emae Island, Shefa Province on 18 March 2015. The aim of the initial rapid assessment is to obtain a more detailed overview of the situation on the ground in order to reach a common understanding of the scale and severity of the response to Cyclone Pam and target the response accordingly.

Local population 862. Female:male – 3:1. Children:adult – 2:1. Local disaster authorities had scheduled a meeting on the morning of the assessment and the team was able to meet with representatives of all communities on the island. During the assessment the teams provided a short briefing of the scope and objective of the assessment.

Key Findings/Observations:

General

  1. The island was severely affected with all almost foliage dislodged, large and small trees downed, and extensive damage to housing.
  2. No fatalities or injuries were reported.
  3. The island roads to affected communities from the airstrip are blocked with debris including large trees which would require chainsaws to move.
  4. Distance from airstrip to local information center (including school, clinic etc) is around 10km. The other coastal road which provides access from sea going vessels is also damaged.
  5. All villages were severely affected with 90% of dwellings reported as damaged or destroyed. All of the villages were accessible by foot, and local CDCCC representatives were present for an island coordination meeting. Providing access to communities for relief goods distribution will be challenging.
  6. There are 5 vehicles on the island but only 3 functional.
  7. No electricity.
  8. No NGOs currently reported to be supporting the island, other than an ongoing UNDP project.
  9. No post-cyclone assistance provided yet.
  10. Communications have been totally down since the cyclone, with communication tower snapped and no mobile coverage. There has been no radio coverage for 1 year

WASH

  1. Villages reported that most of the rainwater storage tanks were damaged, and almost all of the ground water sources are contaminated with debris and considered undrinkable.
  2. There are 3 x 6000l tanks of water remaining, which were full before the cyclone, which is now being rationed for drinking and cooking. It was estimated by local authorities that this will last another 1-2 weeks.
  3. Pumping equipment was also largely destroyed and rain water harvesting equipment was extensively destroyed. There is a bore but it is considered to be contaminated from a local cemetery uphill.
  4. Majority of latrines have been destroyed, and women reported having toileting buckets inside for children. There is limited supply of soap and no report of diarrheal disease.

WASH

  1. Shelter is also a key concern due to large scale damage to individual dwellings (reported at 90%).
  2. An average of 20 persons sleeping per remaining dwelling, with resulting crowding and lack of privacy.
  3. There has been extensive damage to local thatch stocks, which estimated to take at least one year to regenerate. Some houses were also affected by flooding and landslides during the cyclone.

Food

  1. Extensive damage to food gardens and local store almost empty (was not provisioned before the cyclone) – no rice, salt, flour.
  2. Remaining fruit and food stocks, which is estimated to last for next 1-2 weeks.
  3. Loss of livestock (50% of chickens, as well as a number of cows, goats and pigs).

Health

  1. Clinic was partially damaged with water and wind damage to roofing and supplies.
  2. No major injuries were reported from the cyclone, but there have been minor wounds and injuries with clean up.
  3. Dressing room of clinic was extensively destroyed along with dressings and wound and fracture management supplies.
  4. Cold chain fridge damaged and existing vaccines spoiled.
  5. Health clinic still has 6 intact water tanks for water supply, though only 3 have water.
  6. Ground water supply is contaminated with leaves and debris and not tested or used.
  7. Head nurse is treating patients from home until clinic is cleaned up and repaired.
  8. No increase in diarrheal or communicable diseases reported. Main health issues are NCDs, and starting to run low on meds but still have enough for next few weeks. Approximately 20 breastfeeding mothers and 7 pregnant women, not near delivery.
  9. Referral boat has a crack in it and has not been assessed if watertight or repairable

Education

  1. School mainly preserved, with minor damage to roofing but most buildings intact.
  2. School activities currently suspended. No emergency education activities currently ongoing

Protection

  1. Crowding in houses is a concern for women in terms of privacy.
  2. No reported incidences of GBV (by nurse, teacher, and other women). Children were reported to be afraid during the cyclone, but no behavioral changes reported afterwards.

Agniculture

  1. full damage to all cash crops on the island which will have a significant impact on recovery

Coordination

  1. Local disaster authorities have a good existing coordination structure under leadership of area disaster committee chair with each community having a CDCCC focal point, and executive for the island made up of chairman of area disaster committee principal, headmaster, head nurse.

Recommendations:

Food

  1. Provision of seedlings to be considered to stimulate recovery of food gardens. In the meantime food distribution will be required.

WASH

  1. Urgent planning for provision of water in the short term
  2. Water quality assessment (taking into account local opinions regarding contamination of ground water sources)
  3. Rainwater harvesting equipment (tanks, gutters, pipes).
  4. Hygiene kits and soap needed.

Emergency shelter

  1. Temporary shelter required to reduce crowding in remaining dwellings, provide shade and promote self-recovery.
  2. Chainsaws for rebuilding

Health

  1. Restock of dressings and wound care supplies and medicines.
  2. Urgent replace or repair referral boat.

Logistics

  1. Need more chainsaws for debris clearance and house rebuilding (disaster committee has 2 chainsaws, one is broken).
  2. Coastal road also needs to be cleared/repaired for sea-transport

Assessment Team

Phillip Meto – NDMO; Patrick Duigan – IOM; Wanesai Sithole – IOM; Ben Nicholson – VMF; Esrom Mark Vano – Ministry of Justice;

 

Joint National Disaster Management Office – Vanuatu Country Team  

Needs Assessment Mission to Ambrym Island, Malampa  Province

18 March 2015

Introduction:

The National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) together with representatives from the Vanuatu Country Team (VCT) conducted an rapid assessment of Ambrym Island, Malampa province on 18 March 2015. The aim of the initial rapid assessment is to obtain a more detailed overview of the situation on the ground in order to reach a common understanding of the scale and severity of the response to Cyclone Pam and target the response accordingly in a coordinated manner.

The team that left this morning includes assessment teams from Emae, Tongoa, Epi, Ambrym and Pentecost respectively. Upon arrival at Craige-cove airport, the team met by the AVL agent and other community leaders including a police officer. The team were taken to the meeting place at Craige-cove and were briefed by the communities leaders on what actions and measures have been taken. The team thanked the community leaders for accepting the team and were briefed by the team on what were the objectives and purpose of the visit.

The rapid assessment report covers the areas from Maranatha school to Craige-cove respectively.

Key Findings/Observations:

Due to communication difficulties, the Joint rapid assessment team unexpectedly came across Malampa provincial TAG assessment team members. The initial findings reported that TAG members were deployed North and Southeast Ambrym and Paama Island. Concurrently, the Hon. Minister of finance also mobilized an assessment team to Ambrym as well. Apart from this assessment, Malampa TAG assessment team will also submit a report through Malampa Provincial authorities to NDMO by weekend as promised.

General

  1. There are no reported cases of deaths or related injuries.
  2. Majority of the people have moved out from the evacuation centers (Community structures and individual permanent buildings).
  3. According to the assessment and observation report, few households are equipped with solar lighting system

Access

  1. The island roads to affected communities are fully accessible. The roads in most affected villages are still undergone community clearance and especially those along the coastal areas, water and partially damaged.
  2. Most villages can now be reached by foot, vehicles or boat therefore access to communities people and relief goods is accessible.
  3. Local authorities are equipped with trucks and boats that can reach all of the affected communities.

WASH

  1. Potable drinking water is a major concern. 
  2. Affected families claim to have started drinking water from possible contaminated hand pumps, with polytanks and underground wells.
  3. There is very limited or no access to functioning sanitary facilities. 

Health

  1. An initial list of requested medical suppliers for Craige-cove community and school submitted to the team and was later submitted to Baiap Health Centre and few of those requested medications were donated as requested.
  2. No outbreaks of communicable diseases are reported to date.
  3. Latrines are in good and functioning conditions while most Aid posts are still up and running but need urgent medication supplies.

Education

  1. TC PAM school had been closed and student from boarding schools were sent back home to due poor sanitation and communication breakdown. Due to the current situation, the concerned schools will remain close until situation improves.

Shelter

  1. No major damages to housing facilities both within the communities and government institutions. The vulnerable group are well taken care of by CDCs and community authorities while no reported case of sexually abuse and violence.

Food

  1. All food crops, vegetables and fruits were badly destroyed and will only last within a week of consumption.
  2. Fuel supplies will only last about 2 weeks.

WASH

  1. Water well are reported to be contaminated due to lack of securing the water source.

Recommendations:

Relief Distribution/Security

  1. According to the Joint assessment team report, 96% of food crops are destroyed.
  2. Food stock in commercial centers will ONLY last for two (2) weeks.
  3. Fuel stock will also last for ONLY two (2) weeks as well.
  4. Medical supplies need as soon as possible to address the epidemic diseases.

WASH

  1. Set up an alternative waste disposal/management system or restore regular garbage collection system (use water crafts instead of dump trucks)
  2. Roll out sanitary and hygiene advocacy programs to prevent an outbreak of diarrheal and other sanitation related diseases.

Health

  1. Strengthen surveillance in affected communities
  2. Intensify health promotion and advocacy on disease prevention   

Livelihood:

  1. the communities are likely to need an alternative source of income. The main source of income in the area is copra, now that all coconut plantations are badly damaged; they will be no income for more than one year for families.

Communication:

  1. Power restoration

Team Composition

Team Leader:  Lonnie Bong

Isaac Savua

Job Dalili