Get one. Give one.

When you get your Covid-19 vaccine, give $10 so that one of the world's most vulnerable can get theirs.

Let’s pass our gratitude on. Because Covid-19 won’t be over until it’s over for everyone.

DONATE HERE: https://givealittle.co.nz/fundraiser/get-one-give-one

As vaccines roll out across Aotearoa New Zealand, in many low-income countries, vaccines may not be available; there may not be enough of them to go around; and their cost will significantly impact availability thereby increasing inequality.

In being thankful for the availability of vaccines in our country, we are aware that many people are not so fortunate. The Get one. Give one. Campaign aims to protect and support the poorest and most vulnerable.

Through this Campaign, New Zealanders can contribute to a broad global initiative that aims to fund support for vaccine equality in countries that would otherwise miss out.

We encourage you to give as soon as possible even if you are yet to receive your vaccine.

Why Get one. Give one?

• We are painfully aware of the unequal access people have in different places to vaccines. There is a profound global inequity that means some countries have more than enough supplies while others are struggling to get what they need.

• We are deeply grateful, fortunate and blessed to have access to vaccines in New Zealand. The Campaign is born of a desire both to express thankfulness and to ensure others across the world receive the same protection.

• We know from the way this virus works, that it won’t be over for anyone until it’s over for everyone. The Campaign offers each of us the opportunity to play our individual part in bringing this world-wide epidemic to an end.

Where do funds go?

• Funds raised go to the COVAX alliance, which includes UNICEF, WHO (World Health Organisation) and GAVI (the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation). COVAX is the official global channel for the delivery of vaccines to vulnerable and poor countries.

FAQ:

  1. Why is Anglican Missions supporting COVID-19 vaccination?

Anglican Missions supports Covid-19 vaccination as it will alleviate the stress within already resource stressed medical clinics and hospitals. The vaccine has the chance to enhance health-related quality of life by protecting those within vulnerable and poor communities from the effects of the pandemic. The regions with conflict strain and depleted medical supplies will have the opportunity to receive vaccination to reduce the effects of getting covid-19 on top of other health-related risks. The vaccine will reduce the tragic loss of life and help alleviate the impacts of the pandemic by protecting high-risk workers and communities.

 

  1. How does the “Get one. Give one” campaign work?

The New Zealand Ministry of Health and Government have secured enough COVID-19 vaccines for everyone in New Zealand. It is free and available to everyone aged 16 and over.  As vaccines roll out across Aotearoa New Zealand, in many developing countries, they may not be available; there may not be enough of them to go-round and their cost will significantly impact availability thereby increasing inequality gaps. Through this Campaign, New Zealanders can contribute to a broad global initiative that aims to fund support for vaccine equality and access in developing countries. As people receive their vaccine, they will be encouraged to cover, or contribute to the cost, of providing an equivalent vaccine in a developing country.

 

          3. Why $10?

The unit cost of delivering one vaccine comes to between $5NZD and $10NZD. We are asking everyone to donate $10 to cover the delivery of a single vaccine to someone in the majority world. This includes the cost of delivery networks such as local distribution, storage, vaccination centre staffing. etc. Find out more here: https://www.corecommitments.unicef.org/kp/covax-delivery-cost.pdf 

 

  1. Do I have to get one to give one?

No, you do not have to get one to give one. Based on personal choice or health concerns, each donor does not have to have received the vaccine in order to give one.

 

  1. Will I be able to receive a tax credit?

Yes, an automatically generated confirmation is made to the person making the donation. Donations are tax deductible.

 

  1. How many vaccines can I give/ donate?

Anyone can fund as many doses as they would like. This can cover the cost of a single person, a couple, a family and more. There is no minimum or maximum amount you can donate. Any amount of donation will be greatly appreciated.

 

  1. I do not live in New Zealand, can I still donate?

Yes, if you live outside of New Zealand, you can still donate. Givealittle accepts all currencies and doesn’t charge a conversion fee.

 

  1. Where is my money going? 

The funds raised will go to the COVAX alliance, an alliance which includes UNICEF and GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation), the official global channel for delivery of vaccines to vulnerable and poor countries. The COVAX alliance works with private donors, governments, NGOs, community organizations and with vaccine developers and manufacturers, to strengthen health care where it is needed most. Given the New Zealand Government’s commitment to GAVI; its strong track-record and good standards of reporting and accountability, we will link to the work that GAVI is carrying out via its partner UNICEF to channel funding towards vaccine distribution.

 

  1. Who will benefit from vaccine distribution?

The donations and funds gathered will be transferred to UNICEF which, on behalf of the Global COVAX operations will facilitate a global supply of up to two billion vaccine doses to vulnerable and poor communities around the world.

 

  1. How can you help the campaign?

To donate to support “Get one. Give one”,

This how you can spread the word….

School

Work

General resources

Church: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/1hrji1a1054ao6u/AABzSuJe8T_nENzzUOwlVZy-a?dl=0

 

  1. Why is there vaccine inequality?

The unequal access to vaccinations stems from the disproportionate share of early doses. The predominately wealthy nations bought a large sum of the available vaccines by the end of 2020, despite equitably distributed vaccination objectives. This has pushed aside the developing world and their needs under the stress of the pandemic.

 

  1. What is the rate of vaccine administration around the world?

The daily COVID-19 vaccine dose administration per 100 people, highlights the unequitable access to vaccines around the world. With the wealthy nations possessing a large sum of the doses, mass immunisation campaigns have commenced. Since the start of vaccine rollouts, statistics show that up to 45% of all administered doses have been administered to 16% of the world’s high-income countries.

 

  1. How has inequitable vaccine access affected the developing world?

The widening inequality enhanced by the impacts of the pandemic counters the goals outlined in the Sustainable Development Goals. Vaccine inequality exacerbated by the desire for profit prolongs the effects of the pandemic, creating economic downturn and more suffering for everyone. The delay in promoting vaccine equality prompts enhanced social and economic inequality within the developing world. With the developing world falling behind in equitable vaccination, the “Get one. Give one” campaign aims to alleviate a degree of the vaccine inequality.

 

  1. What is the “Get one. Give one” campaign doing to alleviate vaccine inequality?

The Get One Give One campaign set up by Anglican Missions is encouraging people who will receive the vaccine to contribute to the cost of providing an equivalent vaccine in a developing country. The channel for delivery of vaccines is towards vulnerable and poor countries who have missed out on both purchasing and availability of vaccine doses. The funds gathered for the campaign will go towards the COVAX alliance, an alliance which includes UNICEF and GAVI (Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation). GAVI negotiates vaccine prices with a range of organisations and political institutions to create affordable prices to break the vaccine inequality barrier. The funds gathered via the campaign will enhance prospects for equal access to vaccination around the world.